What is Impostor Syndrome? 6 Ways for Designers and Developers to Beat it

What is Impostor Syndrome? 6 Ways for Designers and Developers to Beat it

what is imposter syndromeOur industry is more fragmented than ever. Particularly in web and software development there’s a giant number of languages, JavaScript libraries, frameworks, and approaches to choose from.

Job posts often rate lots of different skills as ‘desirable,’ which we might interpret as an expectation. It’s easy to feel overwhelmed. There’s always a new tool that someone more skilled has mastered, and we’ll never be able to catch up, right?

This feeling is commonly known as ‘impostor syndrome,’ and is characterized by an inability to internalize your own accomplishments and knowledge. Amy Silvers, a UX researcher, information architect, and product designer, currently at Capital One, explains:

“It’s the sense that you are not as skilled or talented as people think you are, and the accompanying belief that at any moment, you’ll be recognized as a fraud. People with impostor syndrome tend to discount their own achievements and attribute them to luck or chance.”

What is impostor syndrome?

what is imposter syndrome: question

Impostor syndrome isn’t just a feeling of insecurity.

“Insecurity might make you hold on to a position that you have outgrown for years simply because you don’t feel comfortable taking action,” points out front end developer Denys Mishunov, author of Confessions of an Impostor on Smashing Magazine. “Someone with impostor syndrome, on the other hand, feels compelled to constantly take action and to be better at whatever they’re doing, but are in constant self-doubt about whether they deserve to be where they are.”

Gavin Elliott, head of interaction design at the Department of Work and Pensions in the UK, believes that impostor syndrome is one of the largest and most damaging challenges we face in our professional lives.

“Whilst impostor syndrome is not classified as a mental illness or disorder,” he argues, “it’s often recognized as a reaction to certain situations — and those situations are often amplified in our line of work. We do nothing to combat it because we end up in a perpetual cycle of fear of not being able to see a way out.”

We do nothing to combat it because we end up in a perpetual cycle of fear of not being able to see a way out.

Gavin Elliott

The term was first used in a 1978 study of high-achieving, successful women in academia. It was originally thought to apply only or mostly to women, but more recent research shows that it’s nearly as common among men. In our industry it’s also prevalent in design, not just development.

Amy Silvers’ research, conducted with her colleague Lori Widelitz-Cavallucci in 2013 (watch them talk about it in “We’re Not Worthy”), found the syndrome among some of the biggest ‘stars’ in UX and design, both male and female.

“My theory about why it’s common among designers is that our jobs are poorly understood and defined, leading to skepticism about the validity of our work,” Amy argues. Also, some corners in the UX design world, in particular, encourage the idea of ‘rock stars’ and ‘ninjas’, and it’s hard to measure up. The fact that there are few accepted measures for objectively evaluating the quality of our work just exacerbates the situation.”

My theory about why it’s common among designers is that our jobs are poorly understood and defined, leading to skepticism about the validity of our work.

Amy Silvers

Not surprisingly, impostor syndrome is prominent in underrepresented communities, too — including women, people from the LGBTQIA+ community, and people of color.

Ivana McConnell, UI/UX designer at Customer.io, explains:

“It’s because we (and I speak here as an LGBT woman and immigrant) are often told that we are not enough. Being constantly told that can cause you to develop this feeling of impostor syndrome, as if, wherever you are, you’ve done so in spite of who you are, not because of it. Eventually, you think people will realize you’ve ‘tricked’ them somehow!”

You might also like: 8 Easy Ways to Master Continual Learning in the Web Design and Development Industry.

The effects of impostor syndrome

what is imposter syndrome: effect

Underestimation and deprecation of your own achievements can have a real impact on you and your professional life.

You may not ask for a well-deserved raise or you might shy away from applying for a job unless you meet every single requirement.

Denys Mishunov

“You may not ask for a well-deserved raise or you might shy away from applying for a job unless you meet every single requirement,” stresses Denys Mishunov. “It might even stop you from asking to speak at a conference that you’ve dreamed of speaking at, simply because you always think you’re not good enough.”

Ivana McConnell agrees and points out that if we focus on being self-critical, it negatively impacts mental and physical health.

“More concretely, it can result in us not developing a particular skill due to analysis paralysis, and devaluing the skills we do have,” she adds.

How to beat impostor syndrome

what is imposter syndrome: beatSo, what can you do if you’re affected by impostor syndrome? Here are some strategies, recommended by web designers and developers who have experienced impostor syndrome first hand.

1. Accept and embrace

One of the most effective ways to deal with impostor syndrome is to accept and change our attitude towards it.

Femke van Schoonhoven, a designer at Uber and co-host of the Design Life podcast, says impostor syndrome has only fuelled her motivation and work ethic.

“Knowing that there’s always more to learn and accomplish drives me to continue to invest in my skillset and teach others,” she explains. “I’ve seen a lot of designers let impostor syndrome paralyze them and harm their self-confidence. The truth is there’s always going to be someone out there who knows more than you. But there are also many more who know less. What value can you provide for those people?”

The truth is there’s always going to be someone out there who knows more than you. But there are also many more who know less. What value can you provide for those people?

Femke van Schoonhoven

Also, allow yourself to fail or stumble when you’re new to something (like a job or a new design tool). It’s absolutely okay not to know everything and accepting that makes it easier to deal with the feelings of being a fraud.

There are several traits and behaviors associated with impostor syndrome. To identify them, check out Gavin Elliott’s article on the subject.

2. Remember you’re not alone

It’s very hard to spot impostor syndrome in others because, as Denys Mishunov points out, those who suffer from it are usually doing very well at whatever they’re working on.

Even those that seem like they’re the most confident, once you get them behind closed doors, they’re quick to break down the facade.

Gavin Elliott

“It’s almost guaranteed, however, that if you talk to your colleagues about these feelings, you will find out that most of them share this feeling to some extent.”

Gavin Elliott agrees. “Even those that seem like they’re the most confident, once you get them behind closed doors, they’re quick to break down the facade.”

Once Amy Silvers started talking to people about her feelings and realized how many people, including many she looked up to and admired, suffer from impostor syndrome, it lost a lot of its power over her.

“If almost everyone has impostor syndrome, it can’t be all that valid,” she exclaims. “We can’t possibly all be impostors! So I’ve accepted that there are going to be times when I’ll feel like an impostor, and that’s not abnormal or weird.”

ImpostHER is a movement of women in technology who share their stories to help others overcome impostor syndrome.

3. Talk to your peers

If you doubt yourself, talk to your colleagues to get a different perspective.

“Last year, someone suggested I should consider stepping up to management,” remembers Si Jobling, a UI engineer at online fashion store ASOS. “I didn’t think I was good enough and that I was WAY out of my depth. After asking peers I could trust, it turned out I had the necessary skills and attitude, so I took the plunge. Now, I’m part of an amazing group of Agile coaches, learning — even sharing — new skills. Reach out, you’ll probably be pleasantly surprised!”

Amy Silvers also suggests to find mentors. “They can help you recognize what you’ve already achieved, and guide you toward becoming even more successful.”

4. Reassure yourself

Even if you don’t feel like talking about it, rest assured that others feel the same way.

Amy Silvers recommends looking around the room, when you’re in a situation in which you feel like an impostor, and realize that probably 80 percent of the people around you feel inadequate as well, no matter how competent they might look.

There’s a funny sort of egotism about impostor syndrome, it requires people to assume that everyone is focused on them, just the one person, and concerned about what they’re doing. In reality, most people are likely too busy worrying about themselves to pay close attention to a single other individual.

Amy Silvers

“There’s a funny sort of egotism about impostor syndrome,” she argues. “It requires people to assume that everyone is focused on them, just the one person, and concerned about what they’re doing. In reality, most people are likely too busy worrying about themselves to pay close attention to a single other individual.”

Jessica Rose, a self-taught technologist and currently technical manager at FutureLearn, finds it helpful to see impostor syndrome as a poorly written error message from your brain.

“Well documented issues like the Dunning-Kruger effect show us that the most terminally unskilled don’t doubt their ability or suffer from impostor syndrome,” she explains. “These doubts and worries that we’re faking our way through our lives might just be our brain letting us know that we’re not doing so bad after all.”

You might also like: How Cutting out Jargon can Help you Achieve Clear Communication.

5. Motivate yourself

Amy also suggests noting your achievements in a journal to track and celebrate your wins.

“I know people who keep a folder full of printed copies of emails praising their work or talking about projects of theirs that were successful,” she says. “It may sound like an odd thing to do, but I’m sure those emails are very calming and reassuring when someone experiences a bout of impostor syndrome.”

Designer and educator Christopher Murphy has developed a tool that he uses to help him address confidence issues. Drawn from the world of sports psychology, he uses ‘court notes’ — short, sharp life-affirming statements — to boost his confidence in moments when he’s feeling low.

“Andy Murray uses ‘court notes’, short self-supporting statements that keep his mind focused during the intensity of a match. As a fellow Scotsman, I’ve developed something similar with mantras: short phrases I refer to when I begin to doubt myself,” Christopher explains.

“My favorite — stolen from Billions — is this one: ‘I’m listening to the voice inside…What’s it saying? That I’m awesome. And to anyone who says that I’m not, do you know what it’s saying? F*** you, that’s what it’s saying.’ Anyone who knows me knows that I have a tendency to swear, so this naturally appealed to me.”

6. Be a pioneer

As noted above, members of underrepresented groups in tech — whether that’s based on ethnicity, gender, or age — are particularly vulnerable to the fear of inadequacy.

Chris Lienert, web developer and currently an engineering manager at health tech company CXA, says that more representation can help immensely here.

“The best counter to the crippling impostor syndrome I’ve found to date is the comfort in knowing that we’re not alone in experiencing this fear. Rely on peer pressure in a good way — if others have leapt into the unknown before us, then we can too. Even one pioneering representative can immeasurably help those who associate with them.”

This means if you belong to an underrepresented group in tech and blog, speak at meetups and conferences, or engage with peers via Twitter, you’ll help other members of that community.

It’s normal not to know everything

what is imposter syndrome: learningIn our industry it’s become kind of trendy to talk about impostor syndrome, and while it’s great that the issue is getting more attention via blog posts, talks at conferences and meetups, and podcasts (check out the impostor syndrome episodes on Front End Happy Hour and Trav & Los), it’s also worth pointing out that it’s really normal not to know everything. In fact, it’s impossible.

So maybe — as CodePen developer Rachel Smith argues in her excellent article on the subject — we shouldn’t label “what should be considered positive personality traits — humility, an acceptance that we can’t be right all the time, a desire to know more — as a ‘syndrome’ that we need to ‘deal with,’ ‘get over,’ or ‘get past’.”

Self-doubt is absolutely normal and healthy, and so there’s no need to ‘suffer.’ Enjoy learning and closing the gaps in your knowledge and focus on knowing one thing (maybe a few) really well. People who know everything about everything don’t exist. There simply are no ‘unicorns.’

Further Reading

Take a look at these articles to find out more about impostor syndrome and how to deal with it:

How do you handle imposter syndrome? Tell us about it in the comments section below.

About the Author

Oliver is an independent editor, content consultant, and founder of Pixel Pioneers. Formerly the editor of net magazine, he has been involved with the web design and development industry for more than a decade, and helps businesses across the world create content that connects with their customers. He curates and chairs Generate, and is passionate about user experience, accessibility, and designing for social good.

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